IPMI Symposium Update

Hi everyone,

It’s finally happening! Tonight, we’ll kick off the “Precious Metals and Mobility” Symposium in New Brunswick, New Jersey. A few updates:

We know several of you are not having fun traveling today with the storm going on in our area. So please note that the Welcome Reception tonight has been moved to 7pm (was 6pm), and we’ll save you a drink.

Also, please view or download the final version of the event program here. Note the times, rooms, and the one speaker change on Tuesday.

We look forward to seeing everyone at The Heldrich tonight.

Precious Metals & Mobility Symposium – Cutoff Date for special rates is March 26

It’s finally happening: IPMI’s first symposium on the transformation of the automotive industry will start April 16. We have an exciting slate of speakers covering many different aspects of this topic. Sign up now as space is limited (seriously, the room will hold 90 people max).

Kitco News will provide news coverage, and it looks like we’ll have Tesla Model 3 to check out on Wednesday. Don’t miss out – hope to see you next month in East Brunswick.

Click here for the full program and registration info:  https://1drv.ms/b/s!ApQo82MBAeM2ioRHU7FPGghRzlvtEg

 

Precious Metals and Mobility Symposium

Mark your Calendars:

An IPMI Symposium on the future role of Platinum Group Metals in the Automotive Industry

When: 16-18 April, 2018

Where: The Heldrich Hotel and Conference Center, New Brunswick / NJ – USA

Details and registration info will be available shortly on the IPMI’s website.

Precious Metals and Mobility

Upcoming event: the IPMI’s European Chapter is hosting a seminar in Prague, Czech Republic, from November 13-14, 2017. Title is a question: “What will our metals’ future look like in Europe?”. I’ll give a glimpse at an upcoming symposium topic on precious metals and mobility and provide some insights into the subject.

For more information and registration, please click here. I look forward to seeing some of you at the event!

NY Times: Platinum Demand faces Impact from Electric Car Growth

 

nyt-t-logoThe New York Times just picked up my Reuters discussion from last week. Generally happy to see that the relevance of this movement is gaining foothold in people’s mind. They might have done without the letters “IPMI” in the title. While it’s true that I am the current IPMI chairman, this interview was a personal one and not an official statement by the institute. Here is the link. 

 

Here is the NASDAQ version of the same event.

And here is Yahoo’s version 🙂

Investing.com ….

Reuters Interview / Q&A on the impact of Hydrogen Fuel Cell vehicles on Platinum

Reuters BannerFuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) vs. battery electric vehicles (BEV) – the precious metals industry is rightfully concerned about this battle. While FCEVs will utilize platinum in their fuel cells, BEVs need none, and each electric vehicle sold of either kind means that one less standard emission control catalyst has been sold. Reason for Reuters to inquire about the scale of the potential effects.

I sometimes feel like a doomsday prophet when I’m just tallying up statements and facts from people and governments in charge, that inevitably lead to one conclusion: electrification is near, and there is no sufficient hydrogen supply infrastructure to counter the expansion of electric charging.

Better to deal with the issue now than staring into an abyss a decade down the road. Precious metals, combined with rare earth elements and other “strategic” metals, are indispensable in making a sustainable planet a reality. So let’s focus on a vision for this world in 2040, and start working towards it.

To read a transcript of the Q&A session please click here.

Update: I just discovered the direct link to Reuter’s summary: click here to read.

Metallic Hydrogen – a new Era in Fuel Storage?

Since the Hindenburg disaster, hydrogen has been known more for its risks than its uses as a fuel component. In its liquid form it has of course been used as rocket fuel, and more recently it has made an entrance as a potential alternative to lithium-ion batteries in cars. Not only is lithium-ion not free from hazards itself, the batteries also add more weight and volume to a device than a tank full of H2. Setting up a supply infrastructure remains an issue, and storage risks make people uncomfortable.

Diamond Anvil

What if hydrogen could be produced in its metallic form? A metal, easy and safe to transport and store? What if this metal could be readily re-converted to its liquid state as needed to be used in fuel cells? A vision of a distant future, perhaps, but professor Isaac Silvera of Harvard University claims to have just taken the first step, the creation of metallic hydrogen. I had a very interesting conversation with him, the product of which was just published on Kitco News. Here is the link: http://www.kitco.com/commentaries/2017-03-21/Metallic-Hydrogen-a-New-Area-in-Hydrogen-Storage.html